Category Archives: Flat knitting

New Pattern: Queen Bee Wrap

I am so excited to have my pattern Queen Bee Wrap published as part of February 2019 issue of I Like Knitting. The theme Honeybee got me all excited and this wrap was fun to design, experimenting with different stitches, textures and eyelets. I love how the Ochre and Alcaucil colorways of Malabrigo Sock Yarn are so close to the yellow and black colors of bees.

The wrap is worked from one end to the other, in sections which range from plain garter, stockinette to stripes, eyelets and bobbles. The change in stitches make this wrap a very interesting, yet mindless knit.

The finished wrap will be 18″ wide and 64″ long, but you can easily change the length by working fewer or more inches or sections.

 

Link to Pattern: Queen Bee Wrap on I Like Knitting
Ravelry Pattern
: Queen Bee Wrap

Norwegian Love

I love knitting baby stuff. They are instant gratification and they turn out so cute. So, when my cousin announced that they are expecting a baby, I was thrilled. Of course, I was happy for them, but I was also happy for myself that I can knit some baby things.

I zeroed in on Norwegian Fir cardigan. Cozy garter stitch and subtle lace on the raglan – what not to love? I decided to use Nako Hoşgeldin yarn (which I have in abundance, thanks to a recent visit to Pony store). This was my first time knitting with bamboo. Yarn is soft and has great stitch definition, but it splits like crazy. Thank my stars, I did not have to frog my knitting. Frogging this yarn will be a nightmare.

The cardigan turned out cuter than I thought. Yarn and the pattern worked out so well together. I made a few modifications to the pattern. The sweater looked too wide, compared to its length, so added an inch to the body and sleeves. I added more buttonholes as well. I had bought these cute buttons from Itsy Bitsy which added the right contrast colors to the monotonous blue sweater.

If I knit this sweater again, I will cast on 5-6 sts more for buttonband. Designer has not accounted additional sts for buttonband, so the cardigan puckers when buttoned up.

Also made these quick, knit booties to go with the sweater.

Patterns:
Cardigan: Norwegian Fir Top Down Cardigan
Booties: Baby Uggs
Yarn: Nako Hoşgeldin

Clapotis

Looks like all the knitters in the world have already knit or are knitting a Clapotis. I didn’t want to be left far behind, so picked up this gorgeous ball of Knit Picks Chroma in Pool Party colorway and started knitting a Clapotis.

While the pattern is pretty straightforward, I wanted to know how long a scarf would I get out of one ball of KP Chroma, so went digging into the bazillion projects on Ravelry and stumbled on this amazing group dedicated for Clapotis. Not only are there many helpful threads for customizing your clapotis, I found this awesome-sauce spreadsheet which gives you a row wise stitch count as well!

I started knitting mine using the spreadsheet and making sure I was on the right section and had the right count. Once I finished the increase section, the straight section was quite mindless. The part where you get to the stitch-to-be-dropped and actually drop it and unravel was super cool. I would knit away just to get to the next drop stitch section just to see the magic unravel (see what I did there?)

And I love how the Pool Party colors show up here. Bias knitting gives this scarf a cool diagonal coloring which looks wonderful. Post blocking, while I am happy with how my scarf turned out, I would have liked it better if it had been longer. Two skeins of Chroma would have given me a longer scarf.

This was a super easy and fun knit. I have another KP Chroma (in another colorway) and I know what I am going to knit with it.

New Pattern: Zeppa Shawl

I am so pleased that Zeppa Shawl is released today. This shawl has a story behind it. I got this gorgeous yarn from Helen of Bessie May yarns after looking through all the lovely colors and finally settling on these three colors. I planned to make Entropy vest with this yarn. It was accepted by Petite Purls and they wanted me to use a yarn which was more commercial and available in the US. So, this yarn was set aside for future hoping a good idea would strike soon.

After a few weeks, I thought of using this for a circular yoke sweater with argyle pattern on the yoke. Interesting yes, but very difficult to implement. I knit up a sample in my son’s size (who loved it to bits, BTW) and released it for testing. None of my testers could get the yoke to work. After multiple revisions, I gave up and concluded that this yarn didn’t want to become a sweater.

And one fine night, as I was on the verge of dozing off, a light bulb went off in my mind and thus, Zeppa was born. I am still embarrassed by the failure of the sweater, but as they say, all is well that ends well. Even though Zeppa was ready long back, I had to wait until the weather turned colder.  So, here it is, ladies and gentlemen, presenting Zeppa.

Zeppa is knit from the top-down, like typical half-circle shawls, with increases placed apart. Stockinette section is alternated with colorwork section which look like wedges using short rows. Colorwork stitch pattern is very easy since you are dealing with only one color on each row. This is a good candidate for stash busting as you can use multiple colors on a single wedge. The shawl is knit in DK weight yarn, which makes it a quick knit.

Zeppa Shawl
Yarn: Bessie May Smile

New Pattern: Texo Shawl

This blog post is way too late, but better late than never, eh?

I was on cloud nine the whole of last week. My feet were barely touching the ground. And with good reason. I had a pattern published by Quince. drumroll. At this point in my designing career, this comes as a much needed opportunity to reach a wider audience and also to know how publishing works.

Quince and team (special mention to Jerusha for putting up with my too frequent mails) were so easy and helpful to work with. I was apprehensive since this was the first time I was working with them, but they never made me feel out of place. Jerusha, the lovely lady she is, always replied cheerfully to my emails, even when she had to give me a bad news.

This was also my first time working with Quince yarn and the experience was equally pleasant. Tern is perfect for texture and the color Quince chose for this design shows off the cable texture very well. Photos are gorgeous, as always with Quince.

Photo © Quince and Co.

Texo Shawl is knit using fingering weight yarn and is knit from the top down, starting from a garter stitch tab. The shawl shown in the photo is 60″ deep with 26″ wingspan. It is perfect for chilly summer evenings. A knitter on Ravelry is knitting this as a nursing cover! You can buy a copy of Texo Shawl on Ravelry or on Quince’s website.

New Pattern: Punto Shawl

Punto Shawl is an asymmetric, crescent shaped which is easy to drape and interesting to knit. The shawl features plain garter rows interspersed with colorwork wedges with pointy edges half the way and curved edges on the other half. The shawl is worked sideways with wedges and the crescent shape achieved using short rows.

Punto Shawl uses the variegated yarns to its benefit by breaking up the colors using slipped stitches. Use the same CC yarn as shown in the sample or be adventurous and use different yarns for each wedge. Instead of using variegated yarn, you can use different solid yarns for each wedge.

Punto Shawl makes a great set with Punto Cowl and Punto Hat. You can buy the shawl pattern alone or grab all the three patterns in one ebook. You can get 30% off either the Punto Shawl pattern or on the Punto ebook using coupon code ‘PUNTO!‘. Hurry, sale will end May 11, midnight, India time.

Ravelry Pattern: Punto Shawl by Anjali M.
MC Yarn: Malabrigo Yarn Worsted
CC Yarn: Malabrigo Sellecion Privada
Needle Size: US #9 5.5 mm for the body

Just Chill

I have been a lurker on the Contiguous Sleeves group on Ravelry since a long time. I was introduced to this technique by Elena Nodel when I test knitted her Tomboy Vest. Since then, I wanted to knit more sweaters made with this technique, but as it always happens, never had the time. When Just Chill was put out for testing, which uses a combo of saddle shoulders with contiguous sleeves, I utilized this great opportunity to learn this technique better. Of course the handsome sweater was a factor too.

Just Chill is seamless and knit top down. The two toned look, combined with the saddle shoulders make this sweater very handsome and masculine. The pattern is beginner friendly, with clear instructions. The only tricky part for a beginner could be the attached I-cord for the buttonbands. Well, what is the fun in knitting a sweater which doesn’t offer any challenge.

I chose Knit Picks Shine Worsted in Platinum and Willow. I even had perfect buttons to go with it. Love the wooden look of the buttons. I am racking my brain to recall where I bought this, but it is drawing a blank.

This sweater is headed to Ahmedabad to meet its recipient, Vihaan, a handsome little nephew of mine. He is the latest addition to my huge, extended family and this is my welcome gift to him. My cousin lost her first baby just before she was due for delivery, so this baby is so much more special for her and for us all. Here is wishing Vihaan a long and fruitful life in this world.

New Pattern: Penstemon

I am a great admirer of designers who churn out beautiful shawls, one after the other. I love the delicate lace and the airy fabric, but never had the courage to design one myself. On one of the casual page-turning of a Japanese lace stitchionary book, my eyes stopped at a particular stitch. I loved the combination of curved outline and the straight lines in the body. I started fantasizing about converting that into a shawl. After a long journey from swatching the stitch, adding a border and another transition lace stitch, Penstemon was born.

 

Penstemon is knit bottom-up, starting from the lace edge. The stockinette body is shaped into a crescent using short rows. The lace part comes as a chart and written instructions too. I knit this using the gorgeous SweetGeorgia Merino Silk Lace which is soft and squishy and has a beautiful shade of colors. Using fingering weight will yield a bigger shawl (and yardage will vary too).

Ravelry Pattern: Penstemon by Anjali M.
Yarn Suggested: SweetGeorgia Merino Silk Lace
Needle Size: US #6 4 mm

New Pattern: Grown-up Hira

Hira is light and breezy and is great for layering on a cold summer evening. It can be worn over a pretty evening dress or make it casual by pairing with jeans and a tee. The beads on the collar and the sleeves jazz up the cardigan turning the simple cardigan into a special-occasion-wear. I just love the beads on the sleeves, if I say so myself.

Hira is knit from the top-down with raglan sleeves. After the body-sleeves split, the body is worked flat with waist shaping. Sleeves are knit in the round. Stitches for the collar are picked and worked flat, knit to the double the width with a garter ridge, over which the collar gets folded and sewn in place. Don’t worry, the sewing is on the wrong side, so not publicly visible at all.

Grown-up Hira is women’s version of Hira, so you can make a mother-daughter cardigan if you like.

Ravelry Pattern: Grown-up Hira by Anjali M.
Yarn Suggested: Madelinetosh Pashmina
Needle Size: US #6 4 mm for the body

New Pattern: Hira

Around a year back, when I saw the Quilted Lattice Stitch in one of the Barbara Walker’s Treasury books, I knew I had to use this for a girl’s cardigan. I was in love with the collared-open-look cardigans and this stitch seemed to be perfect for that. I made my first sample using sports weight yarn and was mighty pleased with the result. I worked on grading and released the pattern to testers. While the testers testing the smaller sizes were very happy with the cardigan, the bigger sizes had a problem of the raglan edge puckering up. It was so bad for the biggest two sizes that I was completely disappointed with my designing (or lack of) skills. As I continued to knit from other designers’ patterns and work on my own design skills, I realized what was the problem with the original Hira. I redid everything using fingering weight yarn, re-graded, got it re-tested and I present you Hira take two.

Ravelry Pattern: Hira by Anjali M.
Yarn Suggested: SweetGeorgia Merino Silk Fine
Sizes: Chest size 18″ – 32″


I used SweetGeorgia Merino Silk Fine in Pomegranate colorway. The different shades of pink and purple in this colorway are soft and subtle. These pictures do not do justice to the amazing colors, but I had to be satisfied with these. Felicia of SweetGeorgia yarns is so sweet (is it why the yarn name has ‘sweet’ in it?) and agreed to send me some yarn for the sample. The yarn is buttery soft, has lovely stitch definition and the silk content adds a shine and drape to this. Knitting with this yarn was a pleasure in itself. The stitches just glide over the needles like butter.

I made the non-beaded version, but one of my testers, Steph, made the beaded one and I love it. Her choice of yarn color and the beads work so well, do you agree?

I am so pleased with this cardigan that I am planning to make one for myself. Do you think this cardigan will work in adult sizes? Would you do any modification to make this work for bigger girls?