New Pattern: Texo Shawl

This blog post is way too late, but better late than never, eh?

I was on cloud nine the whole of last week. My feet were barely touching the ground. And with good reason. I had a pattern published by Quince. drumroll. At this point in my designing career, this comes as a much needed opportunity to reach a wider audience and also to know how publishing works.

Quince and team (special mention to Jerusha for putting up with my too frequent mails) were so easy and helpful to work with. I was apprehensive since this was the first time I was working with them, but they never made me feel out of place. Jerusha, the lovely lady she is, always replied cheerfully to my emails, even when she had to give me a bad news.

This was also my first time working with Quince yarn and the experience was equally pleasant. Tern is perfect for texture and the color Quince chose for this design shows off the cable texture very well. Photos are gorgeous, as always with Quince.

Photo © Quince and Co.

Texo Shawl is knit using fingering weight yarn and is knit from the top down, starting from a garter stitch tab. The shawl shown in the photo is 60″ deep with 26″ wingspan. It is perfect for chilly summer evenings. A knitter on Ravelry is knitting this as a nursing cover! You can buy a copy of Texo Shawl on Ravelry or on Quince’s website.

New Pattern: Dyvest

Dyvest is a unisex vest with an attractive cable stitch pattern down the front. The Y-shaped staghorn cable divides into a similar half-staghorn stitch on either side of the V-neck, hence the name Dyvest.

Ravelry Pattern: Dyvest by Anjali M.
Yarn Suggested: Bessie May Nettle in Coal colorway
[Aran/10 Ply; 70% Wool; 30% Plant Fiber; 87 yards/50 gms]
Needle Size: US #6 4 mm

The staghorn and half-staghorn are simple to knit with just 3 rows of cable and plain wrong side rows. Both cables are charted and written instructions are also provided.


The vest is knit bottom-up in round  until the armholes and then the fronts and back are knit flat. The shoulders are joined using three needle bind-off. Armbands and neckbands are knit after picking up stitches.

Gauge:
16 sts x 22 rows = 4″ in Stockinette Stitch
20 sts x 20 rows = 3.5″ in Staghorn Cable stitch pattern

Sizing:
Finished Chest Measurement:
17.5 [19.5, 21.5, 23.5] [25.5, 27.5, 29.5] inches
Vest is intended to be worn with 1-2″ of positive ease.

I knit the prototype using Bessie May Nettle, which is a blend of wool and plant fiber. This is the first time I worked with a plant fiber and I was blown away by the stitch definition – the cables are neat and crisp. I had to work on the fronts a dozen times, so I can vouch for ‘froggability’ of the yarn too, boys is it sturdy. With the main color as dark grey and the light grey heather, Coal colorway is an excellent choice for men’s and boys’ knits.

Name it and Win it: Pattern Giveaway

I am almost done with this cable vest for boys and girls and I am all set to release it. Except I don’t have a name for it yet. Yes, this is the vest I have an urge to name ‘Thirteenth Time Lucky’ because it took me 12 attempts to get this right. Or should I name it ‘Phew!’?

Humor apart, no matter where I look for inspiration, I seem to draw a blank, so I am turning to my friends and blog readers to help me out. I love word plays, so the name could be a play on the cable (staghorn) or the technique (cable) or anything that you think which suits the vest. Here is one of the photos from the shoot. Not the best, but I don’t want to reveal the best until the release.

Just leave a comment with your suggestion(s). Two winners will receive a copy of this pattern, sent to them on Ravelry or emailed to them. The first winner will be the one who suggested the winning name and the second winner will be randomly picked, so even if your suggested name does not get picked, you still stand a chance to win.

Here are the rules:

1. Leave a comment on this post with your suggestions.
2. No limit on the number of names you can suggest
3. If I decide to use the name you suggested, you will win a copy of the pattern, sent to you as Ravelry gift or PDF e-mailed to you.
4. Contest ends on Jan 15 2013.
5. Winner will be announced once the pattern goes live.
6. As a thank you to the other participants, I will draw a name randomly who will win a copy of this pattern.

Put on your thinking cap and comment away.

New Patterns: Punto Cowl & Hat

I am very happy to announce the release of Punto Cowl & Hat patterns which are released as part of Malabrigo Quickies. From Malabrigo Yarns website: Quickies are small, fast projects which require only one or two skeins of yarn. You could knit a small cowl and a hat in one skein each of MC and CC yarn. These patterns can be bought individually or as an ebook.

While I love variegated yarns,  I don’t like how muddy they look when used with cables or lace. I am not a big fan of pooling in stockinette stitch either, so the obvious step was to pair it with a plain yarn and make something colorful with it. Punto stitch pattern (as I would like to call it) is knit with one yarn per row (no carrying the other yarn) and the colorful CC yarn shows up as little specks or dots against the MC yarn.

Punto Cowl comes in 3 sizes. Small: 20 inches wide, a snug fit around your neck, Medium: 28 inches wide, a loose, comfortable fit around your neck and Long: 44 inches wide, where the cowl can be worn doubled up. All sizes are 8 inches high. Width and height can be easily modified by working more repeats of the stitch pattern.

Punto Hat comes in 4 sizes. S [M, L, XL]: 18 [20, 22, 24] inches. These are the finished sizes. Choose the size which give you no ease or an inch of negative ease.

Punto Hat
Punto Cowl

Punto ebook
Yarns Suggested: Malabrigo Merino Worsted in Natural Colorway
Malabrigo Seleccion Privada in Code B Colorway
Needle Size: US #6 4 mm

New Pattern: Texo Pullover

Texo (Latin word Texo for ‘weave, twine together’) is a take on the traditional crewneck pullover with a cabled pouch added for extra warmth for the hands. The cabled pouch adds interest and texture to the otherwise plain pullover. The i-cord edges on the pouch give it a neat finishing touch. The top-down seamless construction makes this an ideal pullover to try it on as you go and also to modify the body and sleeves length.

Ravelry Pattern: Texo Pullover by Anjali M.
Yarn Suggested: Knit Picks Swish DK
Needle Size: US #5 3.75 mm for the body
US #7 4.5 mm for the cable pouch

What’s cooking?

The next pattern has been ready for release since a week now. I even managed to get decent photos of a very restless kid this time, but Bangalore’s weather has been so bad since a few weeks now, we all are taking turns to fall sick. First it was the kid and now it’s me. Since I can’t wait to show this pattern to the world, here is a sneak peek.

The Lazy Syndrome Pullover

Scene: Surya Emporium, Commercial Street
Date: 3rd December 2008

After going through hundreds and thousands of men’s pullover patterns, I pick some patterns which I like. I finalize one pattern which is liked by me and my hubby. With a tummy which looks more like an overgrown watermelon, I and hubby go to Surya Emporium to buy yarn. I have 8-ply yarn in mind so that the knitting will go faster and have one particular shade in mind. The store guy gives us the sad news that all the newly arrived yarn is tucked away in their storeroom which happens to be on the fourth floor. ‘Can Madam manage?’ he asks eying my tummy sideways. ‘Oh yes’ I declare and off we go for a trip up the stairs which go on endlessly. I pant and heave and finally reach the storeroom. I buy the yarn I want and head back home.

Scene: My Living Room
Date: 4th December 2008

I have the pattern printed out, yarn wound and the needles ready. I decide to make a swatch, the very first time in my life. After going up and down some needle sizes, I finally get the desired gauge. With this big achievement, I cast on for the sweater and knit a few rows.

Scene: My Living Room
Date: 6th December 2008

My tummy realizes that it can’t get any more bigger and decides to spit the little one out. The little boy arrives and the sweater is long forgotten.

Scene: Home
Date: December 2008 – September 2009

The hubster’s attempts at reminding me of the pullover I was planning to make for him were met with ‘Sweater? What sweater?’ Sometimes it was , ‘Hubby? Who hubby?’ He gave up after a few futile attempts.

Scene: Home
Date: October 2009

Bangalore is getting colder by the day. Hubby decides enough is enough. He fishes out the abandoned sweater, prints out the pattern and handing over the yarn, gives me a stern warning, ‘Make this for me… or else’. I knit on endlessly. I modified the pattern to knit the sweater in round. Who likes seaming, right? The cables, twists and turns are very beautiful and keeps my interest piqued for the entire duration. I complete the body in a month. It was an achievement, considering I have a 10-month old baby coming in the way. I looked at the pullover without the sleeves in awe and imagine how it would look like with sleeves.

Scene: New Home
Date: November 2009

20th is hubby’s birthday. I promise myself that I will finish the sweater for him and gift it to him on his birthday. I procrastinate over how to make the sleeves. Should I pick up stitches at the armhole and knit in round? Should I knit the sleeves in round separately and then sew them on? How about just following the pattern and knit them flat? Days were lost in making this decision. Birthday came and went and not a single stitch was added to the sweater.

Scene: New Home
Date:  December 2009

Another stern warning from hubby and I say ‘Let’s get it done with’. I finally decide to follow the pattern and knit the first sleeve flat. The sleeve is done and is admired. I mock attach the sleeves to the sweater and imagine how the second sleeve would look like. Another few days of laziness and another request from hubby ‘It’s really cold now. Can I have my sweater now?’ I sit down and knit like crazy and finish the second sleeve. Lest I lose the steam, I sew the seams, finish the neck band, wash and block. Phew. The pullover, ladies and gentlemen, is finished.

This is a beautiful pattern. Kathy Zimmerman loves cables and it shows. The main cable panel in the middle looks complicated, but is so easy to knit. The smaller, running cables at the sides add a border like look to the main panel. The sweater has the same cable pattern on the back too. The K1,P3 ribbing adds texture to the body and the sleeves. On the whole, one awesome pattern to knit and wear.  I personally don’t like wearing cables, but that’s a different story. My husband, on the other hand, loooooves cables, so he is happy and so am I.