New Pattern: Just Hatched Blanket

I used a simple, textured stitch pattern for Just Hatched Cardigan. I loved the simplicity of this stitch so much that I decided to use it in a blanket. I initially thought of using this as an all over stitch pattern, but I liked it better when I paired it with stockinette. The obvious choice was to have panels of stockinette and texture, but I wanted something different.  Then I zeroed in on making this a center-out blanket with alternate panels of stockinette and texture.

The pattern is written for sport, DK, worsted and Aran weight yarn. The pattern recommends needle  sizes for all yarn weights, but you can use any needle size which gives you the fabric you like. Center-out knitting means you can customize the size easily

Ravelry Pattern: Just Hatched Blanket
Yarn Suggested: Knit Picks Brava Worsted in Canary
Needle Size: US #6 4 mm

 

400+ stitches…


After working on a large project for a good 40 days and when you bind off the last row with 400+ stitches with a mixture of relief and anxiety, only to realize your bind off row was so tight it is making the blanket’s edge flip over and you have to frog the 400+ stitches, pick them up and reknit them with a stretchier bind-off, I am not sure whether you should feel sad that you wasted an hour on this project or happy that it is over. I am going with the latter because thank Bob this blanket is done.

 

Also, when you are working on a center-out blanket, when the initial rows fly off the needles, do you tell yourself ‘wow, I have reached half the size already, so I will be done with this in 1 week’ even when that little voice in your head is telling you, ‘but every row will be longer by 2 sts, so there is no way this will be done in 1 week’, you ask it to shut up anyway? Yeah, that would be me. There is the little voice again saying ‘I told you so’. Shut up already!

New Pattern: Just Hatched Booties

Just Hatched Booties are designed to go with Just Hatched Cardigan. They both use the same stitch pattern which adds interest and texture. These booties knit up fast owing to the use of worsted weight yarn. They need so little yardage that they are ideal to use up left over yarn from other projects.


Pattern: Just Hatched Booties
Needles: US 9 (5.5 mm)
Yarn: Any Worsted Weight Yarn
Sizes offered: Newborn, 3 months, 6 months
Yardage: 60 – 90 yards

When I knit up a baby cardigan, I am usually left with some yarn from the skein which I use to knit up these booties. Hope you all enjoy knitting this one as much as I did.

New Pattern: Just Hatched

When I made a baby blanket for my newest nephew, Atharv, his mother immediately asked me if I can make a newborn sized sweater to go with the blanket. Finding newborn size clothes that fit is hard enough and dear Atharv was a bit underweight at birth, so finding a good fitting cardigan for him was even more difficult. Atharv’s mother liked the soft green color and wanted a sweater in the same one.

I had this idea for a baby cardigan from a long time and realized if I don’t get around to making it now, then it will never get done. I like the simplicity and usefulness of raglan cardigans: top-down, seamless construction, try it on as you go, easy to modify length if need be. I added a wide border of ringlet stitch, a stitch pattern from Barbara Walker’s Treasury, to compliment the plain stockinette body. And that is how Just Hatched came into existence.

Ravelry Pattern: Just Hatched by Anjali M.
Yarn Suggested: Plymouth Yarn Encore Colorspun Worsted
Needle Size: US #9 5.5 mm

New Pattern: Tanvi

I won some gorgeous Indigodragonfly yarn when Kim hosted a giveaway to mark her anniversary. Ever since I held that yarn in my hands, I knew I will have to make my own design out of it. I was a budding designer then and neither had the skills nor the experience to design, so this yarn was treasured for future use. The right time came a few months back and Tanvi was born.

Tanvi was actually planned to be released as part of Knitcircus Summer 2012 issue, but as my luck would have it, the magazine had to close down. So, I decided to self-publish Tanvi.

Ravelry Pattern: Tanvi by Anjali M.
Yarn Suggested: Indigodragonfly Merino Sock
Needle Size: US #2.5 3 mm

Tanvi is a circular yoke, seamless cardigan and is the perfect solution to keep off the spring’s morning chill. True to its name, the cardigan is delicate with eyelets on the yoke and lacy diamonds on the body. It is a great way of showcasing the single skein of hand-dyed sock yarn lying around in the stash.

The cardigan is knit flat from the neck down with circular yoke. After the desired yoke depth is reached, sleeve stitches are put on holders and the body is worked. It comes in sizes 6 months to size 10. This is a great way of using up your ever growing sock yarn stash.

Keep tuned as I have planned a giveaway which is coming soon.

 

A prayer for a baby

The last couple of weeks have been crazy, to say the least. A dear one is fighting a medical problem and there is nothing the rest of us can do, but stand and watch. It sucks to be helpless, right? While this loved one is fighting for life, a cousin of mine is due to give birth to a whole new life. It is great news that she is still carrying the baby inside her at 38 weeks, considering she had a premature birth scare two months back. She has been going through a lot of bad times on the personal front and it was saddening to see her face yet another emotional issue. Thank the almighty, it turned out to be just a scare and things are fine now, but when I heard the news, my decision on the spur was to cast on for a baby blanket with a prayer weaved in every stitch for the baby.

I wanted something mindless, so the focus is on the prayer rather than to keep track of what row I am on. Garter Rib Baby Blanket fit the bill perfectly. I wanted a bigger blanket than I usually make (so the baby can use it in its toddler years too) and hence cast on a larger number. A larger garter border was added to go with the larger blanket. Once the first few rows are done, then it is just one long, mindless knitting. The K3P3 ribbing could have gone faster if I knit continental style, but I was happy with the progress.

I used a new yarn this time. I was told by the Our Own Store guy it is Vardhaman, but our well trusted Rav knitters choose to differ. It is is acrylic, fingering weight for sure, so let’s live with that. I used this yarn held double and with 4.5mm needles, it gives a nice, airy, drapey blanket which is light enough to wrap swathe the baby, but thick enough to keep it warm.

I tried steam blocking acrylic for the first time and I am amazed by the result. I used my Philips Steam Iron which has the ability to give out constant steam. Though it was a slow and tedious process to steam block a big, bad blanket with a measly steam iron, it was all worth it. The uneven stitches evened out, the blanket became drapier and softer. I am wondering why I never treated my previous FOs with a dose of steam.


Ravelry Project Page
Pattern: Garter Rib Baby Blanket
Yarn: Acrylic, fingering weight, held double
Needles: US 7 4.5 mm

 

As Sweet As Honey Baby Blanket: Take 2

I have added more sizes for As Sweet As Honey Baby Blanket. The blanket comes in 3 sizes now.

Stroller Blanket: 22″ x 30″

This is the smallest and is perfect for draping over the baby in a car seat or a stroller. Easy to manage and carry around and of course, quickest to knit up.

Receiving Blanket: 28″ x 36″

Big enough to swaddle a baby and keep it warm, but small enough to make it easy to carry around.

Crib Blanket: 36″ x 52″

The biggest size available, can be used for years to come.

Happy Knitting!

Photo copyright: Knitcircus

As Sweet As Honey Baby Blanket

Yellow, yellow…

Looks like test knitting is the only kind of knitting I am involved in. I recently finished test knitting the Wheatspikes Vest for Sole and before I knew it, I had signed up for another test knit. I am expecting a few additions in my cousins’ families, so want to knit something warm for the expected babies. I love knitting things for infants because they knit up so fast that they are done before you realize it and kid knits are so cute, aren’t they?

Inge Sandholt’s cardigan is a cute, little cardigan, knit flat, bottom-up using sock weight yarn. I had bought some 2-ply acrylic yarn from Surya Emporium intending to use it for an intarsia-cum-fair isle pullover for my husband, but that never worked out. I started off with the main color but had a fear that I might run out of  yarn, so added a few stripes of a contrast color. It turned out to be a wise decision because I did run out of yarn and I had to knit the sleeves in contrast color.

The pattern is well written and is sized from 0-3 to 24 months. It is ideal for someone who is a newbie knitter and wants to try simple lace which involves slipped stitches and yarn overs. The back was the most boring part to knit. The front parts keep you engaged with the 4-row mock cable pattern. Sleeves, of course, get done in a jiffy. It helped that I made them in stripes so I looked forward to the next color change.

The cardigan is generously sized – even though I knit this one in 0-3 months size, it should easily fit a 6 months old baby. I think it will look great on a baby girl. It does have a feminine look to it.

Pattern: Frank & Mathilda by Inge Sandholt
Yarn: 100 gms. of main color and ~50 gms of contrast color
Needles: US 2 2.75mm straights
Ravelry Project Page

Wheatspikes Vest

When I saw this vest offered for test knit, I decided to volunteer. Not that I have a girl to knit for, but the vest was too cute. I don’t have many girly colors in my stash and I had been wanting to use Phildar Copacabana which Preeti had sent me sometime back. This seemed like the perfect opportunity to use this yarn and so I did.

The vest is knit bottom up in pieces, but can be easily adapted to knit in round, which is what another test knitter did. The pattern is well written and I, for once, did not find any errors in the pattern. Unambiguous and easy to follow instructions and the pattern comes in sizes from 0-3 months to 24 months. It knits up quickly and is perfect for that last minute gift or to use up a lone skein or two. I used around 1.5 skeins and still have half of it left. Wondering if I can make a couple of coasters with it – I just love the fresh, bright colors of this yarn.

I didn’t make buttonholes on the sides thinking the neck ribbing will be stretchy and can stretch over a kid’s head, but when I tried this on my son, there is hardly any elasticity in the ribbed neckband. It could be the yarn’s characteristic or it could be because I knit on a tight gauge. I did go down a couple of needle sizes than the recommended one to get the required gauge, so it could be that! I need to rip the shoulder seam apart and make some buttonholes now.

This goes into my gift stash waiting for a lovely girl to come and claim it.

 

Pattern: Wheatspikes Baby Vest by Sole Pitencil
Yarn: 1.5 skeins of Phildar Copacabana
Needles: US 5 3.75mm straights
Ravelry Project Page

Chocolate ice-cream

… with mango sauce and cream. That’s what this blanket reminds me of.

When my friend Anuradha broke the good news that she is expecting, I decided I will knit something for her baby. I was thinking of making a sweater and a hat – something small so that I can knit it in my busy schedule. To my surprise, Anu decided to take up knitting too. She started with a hat and made a cardigan and a vest. Now that she was making these stuff already and was a knitter herself, I couldn’t possibly give her a teeny-weeny sweater, could I? I had to make something good enough for a knitter. That’s how this blanket got created.

Crochet has been on my need-to-learn-this-skill-because-the-FOs-are-so-awesome list, but never got around to doing that. When I was finalizing a blanket pattern for Anu’s blanket, I decided it had to be crochet. One, if I don’t learn crocheting now, I probably never will and two, I have heard crocheting is way faster than knitting. I used the Neat Ripple Pattern by Lucy (or Attic24 as she is known in the crochet world) and loved it. She has detailed photos for crochet newbies like me. The photos were a big help!

After an initial swatch, I had enough confidence that I can finish this blanket. Next step was the choice of colors. I had bought this yarn from Pydal’s for what would have been a vest for my hubby. I soon realized that this yarn is too flimsy and has no stitch definition, so the most natural choice was a baby blanket. I had lots of brown and just one skein of yellow and off-white. After a bit of calculation, I decided to do a row each of yellow and off-white for every five rows of brown. I knit until I ran out of the off-white yarn.

There are so many mistakes in there that I can’t count. For starters, the edges are wavy and uneven. Expert crocheters tell me that the edges are meant to be wavy, so one less mistake to worry about. The starting rows are too tight, so the blanket is narrower at one end and wider at the other. Since it’s a blanket, I hope it’s ok and I hope the baby doesn’t  mind.

I worked on this blanket for an hour everyday for 3-4 weeks. It would have taken even lesser if I wasn’t so new to crochet. So, it is true, crocheting is definitely faster. My next blanket is going to be a crochet blanket.  I have even bought yarn for it. Going off to look for patterns. Crochet ville, here I come!