New Pattern: Zeppa Shawl

I am so pleased that Zeppa Shawl is released today. This shawl has a story behind it. I got this gorgeous yarn from Helen of Bessie May yarns after looking through all the lovely colors and finally settling on these three colors. I planned to make Entropy vest with this yarn. It was accepted by Petite Purls and they wanted me to use a yarn which was more commercial and available in the US. So, this yarn was set aside for future hoping a good idea would strike soon.

After a few weeks, I thought of using this for a circular yoke sweater with argyle pattern on the yoke. Interesting yes, but very difficult to implement. I knit up a sample in my son’s size (who loved it to bits, BTW) and released it for testing. None of my testers could get the yoke to work. After multiple revisions, I gave up and concluded that this yarn didn’t want to become a sweater.

And one fine night, as I was on the verge of dozing off, a light bulb went off in my mind and thus, Zeppa was born. I am still embarrassed by the failure of the sweater, but as they say, all is well that ends well. Even though Zeppa was ready long back, I had to wait until the weather turned colder.  So, here it is, ladies and gentlemen, presenting Zeppa.

Zeppa is knit from the top-down, like typical half-circle shawls, with increases placed apart. Stockinette section is alternated with colorwork section which look like wedges using short rows. Colorwork stitch pattern is very easy since you are dealing with only one color on each row. This is a good candidate for stash busting as you can use multiple colors on a single wedge. The shawl is knit in DK weight yarn, which makes it a quick knit.

Zeppa Shawl
Yarn: Bessie May Smile

 

Zeppa is available at a reduced price of US $2 (yep, 50% off) until Sep 15 using coupon code “Zeppa50″. Add this pattern to your cart on Ravelry and enter the coupon “Zeppa50″ (without the double quotes) and you should see the discounted price.

Crochet illiterate

I have had this project in my to-do queue since ages. It is the popular Inga bag (I know that is not the name of the bag, but I prefer to call it Inga which is easy to type and pronounce) which looks stunning and apparently easy to make. You make a dozen or so granny squares and stitch them up as it says in the pattern. What could be so hard in that, right?

When one of the Ravelry groups announced a Bag KAL, I thought it to be the right time to work on my Inga. I had all the right materials and I started on my very first granny square. After a bazillion attempts and much frogging and recrocheting with a generous amount of cursing, I successfully crocheted my very first granny square.

grannysquare3_medium2It turned out to be too tight (so I was told by a crochet expert, I am sure she knew what she was talking about). For my second granny square, I decided to use a bigger hook. After making the first square, you would think I would have gotten a fair bit of practice and the second would be relatively smoother. Wrong. The second attempt was an utter failure. I had only 11 “sun spokes” the first time around. And the second time miraculously had 13 of them. I needed 12, but always ended up with a number which was definitely not 12. Now, if this was a knitting project, I could have done a k2tog or a kfb to get the right stitch count, but alas crocheting is not same as knitting the last time I checked. I made so many mistakes, I had to cut the yarn at one place because I somehow managed to create a knot while crocheting. I sincerely tried for two whole days and at the end of the second day when I did not have anything looking like a granny square, I finally gave up.

I can tackle complex knitting techniques. Throw at me intarsia, fair isle, purl 3 together through the back loop and I will master it (it might take a while but I will get there), but as soon as you say crochet, my mind closes up. After this incident, I have finally come to the conclusion that my brain doesn’t have the cells required to process crochet. I cannot follow a simple pattern and neither can I read what I have crocheted. So, the verdict is out. I am crochet illiterate.

Random Tuesday

Some random updates from my boring life:

1. The Husband’s Sweater Project is still on. I am at the last few inches of the body and then I will have two sleeves to work on. I had taken this (and only this) project with me on our recent trip to Coorg. Halfway into the vacation, the needle snapped, so I was left with no knitting for the last 2 days. I am blaming it on this incident that the sweater body is still not done. (I know that is a lame excuse, but atleast I have one this time). Considering November is three two and a half months away, I need to pull up my socks and get this sweater done.

2. About the needle that snapped from #1 above? Those were 3.75mm needles. After we got back home, I searched low and high for another pair of 3.75mm needles and I swear I had them, but can’t find them anywhere. After waiting for two days for the needles to miraculously turn up, I gave up. I am now using 3.5mm needles and even though the difference is 0.25mm I have a feeling I am going to regret this later. Blocking should fix this, yes?

3. I am in a constant tug of war between reading and knitting. I know there are enough hours in the day that I can do both, but somehow it never works out. The last knitting project I got done was Texo Shawl, way back in April/May. I haven’t worked solidly on any knitting project after that. Compare that to half a dozen books I read and you will know why. [I read three back to back Flavia de Luce books, Gone Girl (an interesting read), The Giver (can't wait to watch the movie), in case you are interested.] I am still in my reading mode and I hope I switch to knitting mode soon because …

4. I am waiting for some gorgeous yarn for my next design. A shawl again and I can’t wait to start working on it. Hope the yarn gets here soon and I can switch my knitting mode on.

So, what is up with you lately?

New Pattern: Texo Shawl

This blog post is way too late, but better late than never, eh?

I was on cloud nine the whole of last week. My feet were barely touching the ground. And with good reason. I had a pattern published by Quince. drumroll. At this point in my designing career, this comes as a much needed opportunity to reach a wider audience and also to know how publishing works.

Quince and team (special mention to Jerusha for putting up with my too frequent mails) were so easy and helpful to work with. I was apprehensive since this was the first time I was working with them, but they never made me feel out of place. Jerusha, the lovely lady she is, always replied cheerfully to my emails, even when she had to give me a bad news.

This was also my first time working with Quince yarn and the experience was equally pleasant. Tern is perfect for texture and the color Quince chose for this design shows off the cable texture very well. Photos are gorgeous, as always with Quince.

Photo © Quince and Co.

Texo Shawl is knit using fingering weight yarn and is knit from the top down, starting from a garter stitch tab. The shawl shown in the photo is 60″ deep with 26″ wingspan. It is perfect for chilly summer evenings. A knitter on Ravelry is knitting this as a nursing cover! You can buy a copy of Texo Shawl on Ravelry or on Quince’s website.

Charting Lace in Excel: Tallying Increases and Decreases

I have used Excel to chart lace and cable stitches and have found it very helpful and easy to use. I use the keyboard characters for standard symbols like k2tog, ssk, yarn-over etc. For cables, I sometimes use made up symbols (>>>> means right leaning cable over 4 sts) or rely on free knitting fonts that work with Excel. I chart one repeat of lace and once that is done, tailoring it to suit my needs is very simple with cut, copy and paste. Excel is very helpful in grading too, but that is not what I want to share here.

I was charting a large, complicated (for me) lace for a shawl recently. After the first cut was done, I sat down to swatch it only to realize my stitch count was off somewhere. On some rows, I had extra stitches, while on some, I was falling short. It is easy to manually count decreases and increases when your stitch doesn’t span too many columns, but in my case, I was dealing with a 75 column x 40 rows chart. Even if I did muster the courage to manually count it, I would never be sure I had done it right. I decided to use Excel’s in-built functions for help. I have used basic math functions like SUM, SUBTRACT, ROUND etc for grading, but had never tackled a problem like this before. A little sniffing around gave me COUNTIF.

I am using the above chart as a reference.  You can click on these images to see a larger version. There are too many k2tog, ssk and yos, so manual counting is a bit difficult. I want to tally my decreases and increases for every row. I set up a column which gives me the count of yarnovers. I need to know how many times the character ‘o’ appears in every row. The formula to use is COUNTIF(H3:AJ3, “o”).

This formula counts the number of times ‘o’ appears from celss H3 to AJ3. Similarly, set up formulas to count other characters also.

 

The last column TALLY should subtract the decreases from the increases, i.e. YO-SSK-K2TOG-2*DD. We multiply DD by 2 because double decrease reduces the stitch count by 2. If the cell shows zero, then your stitch count is fine, if not, you need to fix your chart. Copy these formulas on all the rows of the chart and you can verify your stitch count on the all the rows.

Here is my setup. See the number ‘2’ on two rows there? That is the reason my stitch count was off. I deleted the yarnovers at the beginning and end of both rows and now the stitch count is intact.

Here is the new chart with tally being all zeroes.

Happy Feet

I had been away from the blogging world for a while now. Knitting world too! Can you believe it has been more than a month since I held knitting needles? .Twitch. I had to take up a certification exam which is essential for my career and considering how much it costs, I sat myself down for a serious study marathon. The last time I studied like this (as they say burning the midnight oil) was for graduation and that was a good decade ago, so I had to get used to this studying concept all over again. I am glad that is done and dusted and I can get back to my regular routine.

The last time I picked up my knitting needles was when I joined the Sock-Along in our very own SAC group. I had been wanting to make N a pair of socks forever now, so naturally I signed up. There was quite a big group of enthusiastic ladies who cheered one another. I have made a pair of socks earlier, so I knew what I was getting into. I chose a safe pattern (with ribs so that sizing does not become a huge issue) and a well know, tried and tested pattern: Susan Anderson’s Kids Ribbed Socks. (I actually typed that as Ribbed Kids Socks, that’s not the same thing, is it?)

I initially picked the cheerful Knit Picks Felici in Botany (of, I love those colors), but changed my in the last minute for two reasons. One, I wanted to play it safe by using a not-that-precious yarn for my first attempt and save the Felici for the second pair and two, which is more important, I couldn’t find the Felici for the life of me. (While I was knitting the socks, the mystery of the missing Felici was eating me away, so I did end up finding it). So, I chose Plymoth Yarn Sockotta. This was a gift from Rima, an SACer, so it made sense to use it for a SAC Along.

The first sock flew off my needles and to beat the notorious second sock syndrome, I cast on for the second sock as soon as I grafted the toe on the first one. The second one took its own sweet time and waited for me patiently to graft its toe shut, which, you will not believe, took me a whole month to get done. This was the time my studies peaked and every time I saw this poor little sock with its mouth wide open, I felt a pang of guilt, but exam was of higher priority. And finally when I did get it stitched up was on the last day of the Sock-Along. Huh.

So, here is the pair of sock modeled by happy, little feet who were too happy to wear handmade socks. Next up, he wants socks with a Mickey Mouse motif on it.

New Pattern: Punto Shawl

Punto Shawl is an asymmetric, crescent shaped which is easy to drape and interesting to knit. The shawl features plain garter rows interspersed with colorwork wedges with pointy edges half the way and curved edges on the other half. The shawl is worked sideways with wedges and the crescent shape achieved using short rows.

Punto Shawl uses the variegated yarns to its benefit by breaking up the colors using slipped stitches. Use the same CC yarn as shown in the sample or be adventurous and use different yarns for each wedge. Instead of using variegated yarn, you can use different solid yarns for each wedge.

Punto Shawl makes a great set with Punto Cowl and Punto Hat. You can buy the shawl pattern alone or grab all the three patterns in one ebook. You can get 30% off either the Punto Shawl pattern or on the Punto ebook using coupon code ‘PUNTO!‘. Hurry, sale will end May 11, midnight, India time.

Ravelry Pattern: Punto Shawl by Anjali M.
MC Yarn: Malabrigo Yarn Worsted
CC Yarn: Malabrigo Sellecion Privada
Needle Size: US #9 5.5 mm for the body